GUIDE TO BIRDS OF ARMENIA

Semi-collared Flycathcher

Adult male. Photo: M. Guyt

Latin name: Ficedula semitorquata

Latin name: Ficedula semitorquata

Family name: Old World Flycatchers 

Family name: Old World Flycatchers 

The Semi-collared Flycatcher is not just a forest specialist – even inside the forest it has a particular preferences and occupies the canopy level. It like to sit at a dry stick at upper part of the tree, watching the forest from above. Then, suddenly it takes a flight catching the flying insects and returns to its post. That is why the bird has long, swallow-like wings and quite a large mouth – to fly fast enough and to catch the insect in flight. With such a unique technique of hunting and the place – where it hunts, the Flycatcher stands out of competition with other insect-eating forest birds, which are taking the prey from leaves, steams, and branches. The Flycatcher is a cavity-nester and prefers old-growth undisturbed forests.

The Semi-collared Flycatcher is not just a forest specialist – even inside the forest it has a particular preferences and occupies the canopy level. It like to sit at a dry stick at upper part of the tree, watching the forest from above. Then, suddenly it takes a flight catching the flying insects and returns to its post. That is why the bird has long, swallow-like wings and quite a large mouth – to fly fast enough and to catch the insect in flight. With such a unique technique of hunting and the place – where it hunts, the Flycatcher stands out of competition with other insect-eating forest birds, which are taking the prey from leaves, steams, and branches. The Flycatcher is a cavity-nester and prefers old-growth undisturbed forests.

Conservation status

The number of Semi-collared Flycatcher moderately declines in last decade. Moreover its distribution range also shrinks in the areas, which are being intensively urbanized. The main threat for this sensitive species remains unsustainable forestry management, which has to be reviewed to protect the species. 

The number of Semi-collared Flycatcher moderately declines in last decade. Moreover its distribution range also shrinks in the areas, which are being intensively urbanized. The main threat for this sensitive species remains unsustainable forestry management, which has to be reviewed to protect the species.

More specific information about this species

Habitat

The Semi-collared Flycatcher lives in open forest, mostly montane, preferring oak and beech or oak and hornbeam compositions; it inhabits old-growth woodlands up to 2000 m a.s.l.

 

Food & Feeding

Its food mainly consists on flying insects, including mayflies, stoneflies, bugs, adult caddis flies, adult dipterans, hymenopterans, and beetles. Frequents tree canopy, sometimes bushes, making frequent sallies to catch flying insects; less often, takes prey directly from leaves or branches, while hovering.

 

Breeding

The species breeds from mid-April to mid-July. It is typically monogamous and solitary. Nest is built by female during  5–16 days, and is a cup of dead leaves, dead plant stems, lichens and moss, lined with fine rootlets, grasses or bark fibre, sometimes hair, feathers or plant down. It is placed in hole in tree, mostly in shaded site in dead branch or trunk, commonly in old hole of woodpeckers.

 

Movements

Migratory. Non-breeding quarters are located in Eastern and Central Africa. The species arrives in mid-April and departs the country in late August to September.

 

Family

Old World Flycatchers

 

Source of information

The Handbook to the Birds of the World

The Birds of the Western Palearctic

More specific information about this species

Habitat

The Semi-collared Flycatcher lives in open forest, mostly montane, preferring oak and beech or oak and hornbeam compositions; it inhabits old-growth woodlands up to 2000 m a.s.l.

 

Food & Feeding

Its food mainly consists on flying insects, including mayflies, stoneflies, bugs, adult caddis flies, adult dipterans, hymenopterans, and beetles. Frequents tree canopy, sometimes bushes, making frequent sallies to catch flying insects; less often, takes prey directly from leaves or branches, while hovering.

 

Breeding

The species breeds from mid-April to mid-July. It is typically monogamous and solitary. Nest is built by female during  5–16 days, and is a cup of dead leaves, dead plant stems, lichens and moss, lined with fine rootlets, grasses or bark fibre, sometimes hair, feathers or plant down. It is placed in hole in tree, mostly in shaded site in dead branch or trunk, commonly in old hole of woodpeckers.

 

Movements

Migratory. Non-breeding quarters are located in Eastern and Central Africa. The species arrives in mid-April and departs the country in late August to September.

 

Family

Old World Flycatchers

 

Source of information

The Handbook to the Birds of the World

The Birds of the Western Palearctic

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