GUIDE TO BIRDS OF ARMENIA

European Turtle-dove

Adult bird. Photo: I.J.V. Perez

Latin name: Streptopelia turtur

Latin name: Streptopelia turtur

Family name: Pigeons and Doves 

Family name: Pigeons and Doves 

The European Turtle-dove is the largest among other doves of Armenia, and unlike the other two species, doesn’t breed in the villages and towns. Nevertheless it uses the cereal fields to get the food. Again unlike the other two residential species, the Turtle-dove migrates all the way south to Africa. On passage the Turtle-dove flies over some Arabic and North-African countries, where becomes shot in mass. That is why the number of the species steeply declines globally. Turtle-dove returns to Armenia in late April – early May, when we can hear the specific voice of the male, aimed at attracting females. The species lays two eggs and after fledging of the young, begin preparation to autumn migration, which takes place in September.

The European Turtle-dove is the largest among other doves of Armenia, and unlike the other two species, doesn’t breed in the villages and towns. Nevertheless it uses the cereal fields to get the food. Again unlike the other two residential species, the Turtle-dove migrates all the way south to Africa. On passage the Turtle-dove flies over some Arabic and North-African countries, where becomes shot in mass. That is why the number of the species steeply declines globally. Turtle-dove returns to Armenia in late April – early May, when we can hear the specific voice of the male, aimed at attracting females. The species lays two eggs and after fledging of the young, begin preparation to autumn migration, which takes place in September.

Conservation status

The species is in steep decline, which probably is caused by global threat of poaching during migration. Also transformation of lands under agricultural needs, including destruction of hedges and scrubs, loss of semi-natural habitats, and changes in agricultural practices – can reduce food supply and nesting habitat availability.  

The species is in steep decline, which probably is caused by global threat of poaching during migration. Also transformation of lands under agricultural needs, including destruction of hedges and scrubs, loss of semi-natural habitats, and changes in agricultural practices – can reduce food supply and nesting habitat availability.

More specific information about this species and more specific information about this species

Habitat

Wide variety of woodland types, as well as steppe and semi-desert; does not inhabit unbroken forests, preferring forest borders, open woodland and heath with tree clumps. Avoids windy, cloudy and wet regions preferring sunny, dry and sheltered areas. Although tolerates humans does not breed close to towns or villages.
Elevation range is from 800 to 2.100 m a.s.l.

Food & Feeding

Seeds and fruits of weeds and cereals comprise most of diet. Berries and fungi are occasionally eaten; also earthworms, some insects, pupae and small snails. Herbaceous species found in the diet whose seeds ripen earlier in the season may play an important role in nesting since they are frequently the only available food in the first half of the breeding season. Although largely arboreal, finds most of its food on the ground.

Breeding

Starts in May. Nest is flimsy platform of small twigs, lined with grass stems or roots and leaves, placed in a tree, shrub or hedge.  Lays two white eggs; incubation 13–14 days; fledging 20 days. Young birds stay with adults for a short period and then dispersion starts.

Movements

Strongly migratory in most populations. Winter from Senegambia to Ethiopia and Eritrea. Birds set off South in July to September / October, moving again to the North in March–May.

Family

Pigeons and Doves

Source of information

The Handbook to the Birds of the World

The Birds of the Western Palearctic

More specific information about this species

Habitat

Wide variety of woodland types, as well as steppe and semi-desert; does not inhabit unbroken forests, preferring forest borders, open woodland and heath with tree clumps. Avoids windy, cloudy and wet regions preferring sunny, dry and sheltered areas. Although tolerates humans does not breed close to towns or villages.
Elevation range is from 800 to 2.100 m a.s.l.

 

Food & Feeding

Seeds and fruits of weeds and cereals comprise most of diet. Berries and fungi are occasionally eaten; also earthworms, some insects, pupae and small snails. Herbaceous species found in the diet whose seeds ripen earlier in the season may play an important role in nesting since they are frequently the only available food in the first half of the breeding season. Although largely arboreal, finds most of its food on the ground.

 

Breeding

Starts in May. Nest is flimsy platform of small twigs, lined with grass stems or roots and leaves, placed in a tree, shrub or hedge.  Lays two white eggs; incubation 13–14 days; fledging 20 days. Young birds stay with adults for a short period and then dispersion starts.

Movements

Strongly migratory in most populations. Winter from Senegambia to Ethiopia and Eritrea. Birds set off South in July to September / October, moving again to the North in March–May.

 

Family

Pigeons and Doves

 

Source of information

The Handbook to the Birds of the World

The Birds of the Western Palearctic

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