GUIDE TO BIRDS OF ARMENIA

Barred Warbler

Adult male. Photo: G. Bachmeier .

Latin name: Sylvia nisoria

Latin name: Sylvia nisoria

Family name: Old World Warblers 

Family name: Old World Warblers 

The Barred Warbler is the largest of Sylvia warblers. It is very secretive inhabitant of open landscapes, that is why, for a long time it was considered a rare species. They winter in Eastern Africa and come back to Armenia in early May. This is the time when the singing males are usually heard. They have complex mating system: once female starts laying eggs, male establishes new territories in attempt to pair with second or even third female. That is why, although the species is territorial the nests might be clustered. They make close breeding associations with Red-backed Shrike, with nests sited near latter species.

The Barred Warbler is the largest of Sylvia warblers. It is very secretive inhabitant of open landscapes, that is why, for a long time it was considered a rare species. They winter in Eastern Africa and come back to Armenia in early May. This is the time when the singing males are usually heard. They have complex mating system: once female starts laying eggs, male establishes new territories in attempt to pair with second or even third female. That is why, although the species is territorial the nests might be clustered. They make close breeding associations with Red-backed Shrike, with nests sited near latter species.

Conservation status

It is hard to estimate the number of Barred Warblers and its population trend because of the secretive behavior of the species. Nevertheless, the Barred Warblers appear to be habitat sensitive as they definitely don’t occur in highly transformed areas.

It is hard to estimate the number of Barred Warblers and its population trend because of the secretive behavior of the species. Nevertheless, the Barred Warblers appear to be habitat sensitive as they definitely don’t occur in highly transformed areas.

More specific information about this species

Habitat

Originally it is a forest species, which in Armenia mainly occupies open semidesert, dry mountain steppes and juniper woodlands, from 1,100 to 2,400 m a.s.l.

 

Food & Feeding

Mostly insectivorous during breeding season; fruits become steadily more important in diet once breeding finished and just before and during migration. Forages near ground in bushes, sometimes in canopy of taller trees. Takes invertebrates mainly from leaves; rarely, catches insects on ground or in flight.

 

Breeding

The season is from May to July; laying mainly in June; one brood per season. Complex mating system including both monogamy and polygamy; once female starts laying, male establishes new territories in attempt to pair with second or even third female. Therefore, although the species is territorial, but nests often clustered in suitable sites. Male constructs some loose nest platforms; such “cock nests” probably used by female merely as indication of male quality, as she rarely uses platforms but normally takes some of the material for construction of true nest, an open elaborate cup-shaped structure coated externally with spider webs and silk of caterpillar cocoons. Clutch 3–6 eggs. In monogamous pairs, incubation of eggs and care of chicks is done by both sexes, although female invests much more time in parental duties; incubation period 12–13 days, nestling period 10–11 days; fledglings cared for by parents for a further 3 weeks.

 

Movements

The species is migratory and spend non-breeding season in Eastern Africa. Departure from breeding grounds from as early as July, lasting until Sept; adults leave earlier than juveniles. Leaves wintering grounds in late March to early April. 

 

Family

Old World Warblers

 

Source of information

The Handbook to the Birds of the World

The Birds of the Western Palearctic

More specific information about this species

Habitat

Originally it is a forest species, which in Armenia mainly occupies open semidesert, dry mountain steppes and juniper woodlands, from 1,100 to 2,400 m a.s.l.

 

Food & Feeding

Mostly insectivorous during breeding season; fruits become steadily more important in diet once breeding finished and just before and during migration. Forages near ground in bushes, sometimes in canopy of taller trees. Takes invertebrates mainly from leaves; rarely, catches insects on ground or in flight.

 

Breeding

The season is from May to July; laying mainly in June; one brood per season. Complex mating system including both monogamy and polygamy; once female starts laying, male establishes new territories in attempt to pair with second or even third female. Therefore, although the species is territorial, but nests often clustered in suitable sites. Male constructs some loose nest platforms; such “cock nests” probably used by female merely as indication of male quality, as she rarely uses platforms but normally takes some of the material for construction of true nest, an open elaborate cup-shaped structure coated externally with spider webs and silk of caterpillar cocoons. Clutch 3–6 eggs. In monogamous pairs, incubation of eggs and care of chicks is done by both sexes, although female invests much more time in parental duties; incubation period 12–13 days, nestling period 10–11 days; fledglings cared for by parents for a further 3 weeks.

 

Movements

The species is migratory and spend non-breeding season in Eastern Africa. Departure from breeding grounds from as early as July, lasting until Sept; adults leave earlier than juveniles. Leaves wintering grounds in late March to early April.

 

Family

Old World Warblers

 

Source of information

The Handbook to the Birds of the World

The Birds of the Western Palearctic

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